Albuquerque’s BK Taiko Japanese drum group (LIVE) in KGLP’s studio for Green Chile Revival & Medicine Show

June 10, 2017

Camille's Sidewalk Cafe is sponsoring a Japanese drumming performance by BK Taiko (a Japanese drum group from Albuquerque) during Gallup ArtsCrawl today, Saturday, June 9, 2017, from 8 - 9pm. Special guests including Medal of Honor recipient Hiroshi Miyamura have been invited.

KGLP's Tom Funk had the group on his "Green Chile Revival & Medicine Show" at 12:30pm today.

More information at:

http://www.BKWoW.com and on Facebook:

www.facebook.com/BKDojo

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Somos un Pueblo Unido in Gallup, discussing worker rights and U.S. immigration policies 6/7/17 at KGLP

June 10, 2017

KGLP's Trey Chavez speaks with representatives of the Gallup contingent of Somos un Pueblo Unido (http://somosunpueblounido.org/ - "We Are a United People") about worker's rights, U.S. immigration policies, and more.

---- Press Releases ----

Dozens Rally to Support Immigrant and Workers' Rights; Release Report on Impact of Wage Theft on Native American and Latino Immigrant Workers in Gallup

Gallup, NM - May 1, 2017 - Today, dozens of workers and their families held a rally and vigil in support of immigrants and working families as part of a national day of action and International Workers Day.

As the Trump administration continues to use its power to ramp up deportations of immigrant workers, a policy that could devastate local rural and semi-urban economies in New Mexico, hundreds of workers throughout the state held marches, rallies, and vigils to defend immigrant families and remind lawmakers how important improving workplace standards are to the state's economy.

"We need our government to help make our lives better not worse," said Josefina Rebollos, a member of Somos Gallup. "Finding a job is hard enough in McKinley County, not getting paid all the hours worked makes life harder for not only my family but our entire community."

The rally for worker's rights was held in front of the McKinley County Courthouse and organized by Somos Gallup, an affiliate of Somos Un Pueblo Unido, as part of the newly formed McKinley Worker Justice Coalition.

The coalition was formed in September 2015 to bring organizations and community members together to strengthen workers' rights and improve workplace conditions and is made up of Somos Gallup, the McKinley Collaborative for Health Equity and the McKinley Community Health Alliance.

During the rally, members of the coalition also released a health impact assessment report regarding the impact of wage theft and other employment violations on the economic security and health of Native American and Latino immigrant workers in Gallup.

Among some key findings, the report highlighted the pervasive nature of wage theft and other employment violations in McKinley County, the poorest county in the state with one of the highest unemployment rates. 70% of the 50 workers surveyed reported experiencing some form of wage theft--Latino immigrant workers at a similar rate as Native American workers.

Nearly half of Native American and Latino immigrant workers reported having experienced discrimination and harassment on the job, and one out of four workers had been injured on the job.

"When workers are not paid fairly or not at all, workers and their families are not the only ones impacted. The entire community is also cheated," said Anna M. Rondon with the McKinley Collaborative for Health Equity. "It also affects workers' health and this increases stress in their lives. We are very proud of being part of putting together this Health Impact Assessment on Wage Theft. This was a community-led effort that united both Navajo and Latino workers."

"Wage theft is a public health issue," said Jessica Jensen, HEP Grants & Capacity Building Strategist with the New Mexico Health Equity Partnership, an initiative at the Santa Fe Community Foundation concerned about the health and wellness of New Mexico's families and communities. "The HIA report is of critical importance as it illustrates that wage theft is connected to higher levels of stress for workers, which leads to poor health outcomes. Ending wage theft would improve the health conditions that Native American and Latino immigrants are experiencing in Gallup."

The report also incorporates recommendations for local policymakers from the Coalition to contain the scope of employment violations in the county. For more information about the report titled "Two Groups, One Community: The Impact of Wage Theft and Other Employment Violations on Native American and Latino Immigrant Workers in Gallup", go to www.somosunpueblounido.org/wagewatch

Click here to read full report.
Click here to read abbreviated report.

XXX

Somos Un Pueblo Unido is a statewide immigrant-led civil and worker's rights organization with membership teams in ten counties and offices in Santa Fe and Roswell.

--- Press Release ---

Lawsuit Alleging N.M. Department of Workforce Solutions Fails to Enforce Wage Protection Laws Goes Forward
SANTA FE - April 28, 2017 - Today, New Mexico's First Judicial Court ruled that a lawsuit charging that Department of Workforce Solutions (DWS) must enforce state laws protecting working people against wage theft from their employers can go forward. Today's ruling denies DWS's request to dismiss the lawsuit. The individuals and groups who filed the case will request a final ruling from the court this summer.

Wage theft is the illegal practice of not paying workers for all of their work, including violating minimum wage laws, not paying overtime, and forcing people to work off the clock.

The lawsuit, Olivas v. Bussey, was filed in January 2017 by four workers who were victims of wage theft and workers' rights organizations El Centro de Igualdad y Derechos, New Mexico Comunidades en Accion y de Fé (CAFÉ), Organizers in the Land of Enchantment (OLÉ), and Somos Un Pueblo Unido. Elizabeth Wagoner of the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty (the Center) is lead counsel on a legal team that includes the Center's Gail Evans and Tim Davis, Santa Fe attorney Daniel Yohalem, and Gabriela Ibañez Guzmán of Somos Un Pueblo Unido.

"This ruling reaffirms that every hard working New Mexican - not just those with the money to hire lawyers-deserves to be paid for every hour they work," said Wagoner. "Our state government cannot turn a blind eye when employers break laws protecting working people."

"DWS's failure to enforce New Mexico's wage and hour laws is one more example of how hard working New Mexicans are getting the short end of the stick in our state-but they are fighting back. This case is too important to dismiss, particularly given the profound impact wage theft has on New Mexican working families. We applaud the ruling and look forward to continuing to expose systemic failures by DWS to enforce New Mexico wage and hour laws, "said Marco Nuñez, workers' justice coordinator at El CENTRO de Igualdad y Derechos.

New Mexico has some of the strongest wage enforcement laws in the country. In 2009, the legislature made them even stronger. However, DWS illegally refused to enforce these new laws and imposed onerous and arbitrary internal policies that have enabled unscrupulous employers to get away with wage theft unchecked.

"Our government should be working with us, not against us, to hold unscrupulous employers accountable when wages are stolen and our rights trampled on," said Gabriela Ibañez Guzmán, staff attorney at Somos Un Pueblo Unido's worker center. "This administration has long ignored the conditions of struggling workers in New Mexico, but our families are pushing back. It's important that this case is moving forward so wage theft victims can be heard and the department's disregard for the law exposed."

Background on the lawsuit:

New Mexico's state-level protections against wage theft include: (1) Mandatory statutory damages to victims of wage theft, calculated as full back wages, plus interest, plus double damages; (2) At least a three-year statute of limitations, or longer when the violation is part of a "continuing course of conduct"; (3) A minimum wage of $7.50 and overtime pay for hours over 40 at one-and-one-half times the employee's regular hourly rate; (4) the department must investigate and take legal action on valid and enforceable claims filed by workers who cannot afford private attorneys.

The lawsuit charges that DWS has:

▪ illegally imposed a $10,000 cap on wage theft: they do not investigate or take any enforcement action on wage claims worth $10,000 or more.

▪ imposed an illegal one-year time limit on liability for wage theft: they do not investigate or take any enforcement action on claims for back pay that go back more than one year from the date an employee files a claim, despite the N.M. Legislature's 2009 decision to lengthen the statute of limitations for wage claims to at least three years.

▪ illegally imposed a policy against holding employers liable for any statutory damages at the administrative enforcement phase of a case, thereby eliminating the financial deterrent for engaging in wage theft, despite the Legislature's 2009 decision to double the penalty for engaging in wage theft.

▪ adopted policies and procedures that require the permanent closure of wage claims for procedural reasons, such as when a claimant misses a 10-day deadline, without regard to the strength of the claim or whether the claimant received notice of the deadline.

The lawsuit seeks an order that the Department of Workforce Solutions must stop applying these unlawful policies, as well as an order that the Department must re-open and investigate cases impacted by these policies.
The defendants in the lawsuit are the Department of Workforce Solutions, Cabinet Secretary Celina Bussey, and Labor Relations Division Director Jason Dean.

In January, 2017, the First Judicial District Court issued a temporary restraining order requiring the Department of Workforce Solutions to accept wage claims without regard to the Department's illegal $10,000 cap or illegal one-year lookback period and to keep records of claims impacted by these policies.

####

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Arnold Clifford presentation on Southwestern plants 5/21/17 @ Plateau Sciences Society

May 22, 2017

Audio of Botanist Arnold Clifford's May 21, 2017 presentation at Plateau Science Society, on Native plants of the Southwest, including those with medicinal, edible, and utilitarian applications such as the dye for wool.

http://www.sjc.cc.nm.us/pages/431.asp

http://fourcornersfreepress.com/?p=1850

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQXx6T6z-I0

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U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich 5/19/17 on KGLP-NM update

May 19, 2017

KGLP Station Manager Rachel Kaub speaks by phone with U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-NM) about a variety of issues impacting New Mexicans, including the efforts to appeal the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), the BLM gas reclamation rule appeal that was defeated in the Senate, the Zuni Trails initiative, protection of Native artifacts and religious relics, and the ongoing investigation of Russian ties to the Trump campaign, as well as the appointment of a special prosecutor.

--- recent Heinrich press releases ---

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 19, 2017) — In recognition of National Kids to Parks Day on May 20, U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) launched an online resource guide to provide New Mexico families with ideas and activities to explore the great outdoors. The seventh annual Kids to Parks Day kicks off a summer-long series of events at local, state, and national parks.

Families are encouraged to visit www.heinrich.senate.gov/kids-to-parks to find events taking place in their area, get ideas for family activities, and discover outdoor recreation programs for children all year-round.

"Our national parks and public lands are where memories are made, and I encourage New Mexico families to take advantage of the Kids to Parks events taking place across the state," Heinrich said. "Connecting kids to the outdoors, whether it’s playing in the local park down the street or hiking and camping in a national park, can inspire a lifelong connection to conservation, while reaping all of the health benefits that go along with an active lifestyle. "

Senator Heinrich joined U.S. Senators Ron Wyden, (D-Ore.), Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Rob Portman (R-Ohio), and Mazie K. Hirono (D-Hawaii) in passing a bipartisan resolution to encourage children to get outdoors by designating May 20 National Kids to Parks Day.

----

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 18, 2017) — Today, U.S. Senators Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, and Tom Carper (D-Del.) and Gary Peters (D-Mich.), members of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, sent a letter to Director of National Intelligence (DNI) Dan Coats requesting a review and damage assessment regarding whether classified information may have been disclosed by President Trump or White House officials to representatives of the Russian government.

“Last Wednesday—one day after firing FBI Director James B. Comey—President Trump welcomed into the Oval Office Sergei Lavrov, the Russian Foreign Minister, and Sergey Kislyak, the Russian Ambassador to the United States,” the senators wrote. “According to recent reports, during this same meeting, President Trump revealed ‘highly classified information’ to Minister Lavrov and Ambassador Kislyak, and others present in the meeting.”

“While the President is empowered to classify and declassify information at his discretion, it is unclear whether any alleged disclosure during last week’s meeting, if it occurred, was an intentional act of ‘instant’ declassification, an inadvertent disclosure, or done for any other reason,” the senators continued. “What is clear is that any alleged disclosure of this nature may compromise sensitive methods of intelligence collection, imperil sources who risk their lives to provide information, and result in reduced intelligence-sharing with our partners and reduced confidence in the ability of the U.S. Government to keep a secret.”

“We request that you determine whether classified information was disclosed or compromised in any way during the May 10, 2017 meeting, and if so, to designate the National Counterintelligence Executive, in consultation with the Inspector General of the Intelligence Community, as the lead agency for conducting a damage assessment.”

The full text of the letter can be found here and below.

May 18, 2017

The Honorable Daniel R. Coats
Director of National Intelligence
Washington, D.C. 20511

Dear Director Coats:

We write to request a review and damage assessment regarding whether any classified information may have been disclosed by the President or his senior advisers to representatives of the Russian government during a meeting in the Oval Office on May 10, 2017. As you know, the ability to properly safeguard classified information is a fundamental obligation of those entrusted with our nation’s secrets, and any allegation of disclosure involving a foreign adversary must be thoroughly reviewed with action taken to mitigate the potential damage.

Last Wednesday—one day after firing FBI Director James B. Comey—President Trump welcomed into the Oval Office Sergei Lavrov, the Russian Foreign Minister, and Sergey Kislyak, the Russian Ambassador to the United States. According to recent reports, during this same meeting, President Trump revealed “highly classified information” to Minister Lavrov and Ambassador Kislyak, and others present in the meeting. One official described the disclosure as involving “code-word information,” and added that President Trump “revealed more information to the Russian ambassador than we have shared with our own allies.” Shortly after the meeting, photos were publicly released showing President Trump shaking hands with Minister Lavrov and Ambassador Kisylak, which were taken by the lone member of the press allowed to attend the event, a photographer from the Russian state news agency TASS.

According to one report, “(a)fter Trump’s meeting, senior White House officials took steps to contain the damage, placing calls to the CIA and National Security Agency.” The report further stated that one official “also called for the problematic portion of Trump’s discussion to be stricken from internal memos and for the full transcript to be limited to a small circle of recipients, efforts to prevent sensitive details from being disseminated further or leaked.”

While several Administration officials have strongly disputed that the meeting discussed sources and methods or military operations not already publicly disclosed, no one—including President Trump or National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster—has yet denied that classified information was shared, possibly including specific threat information. In fact, Tuesday morning, President Trump tweeted:

As President I wanted to share with Russia (at an openly scheduled W.H. meeting) which I have the absolute right to do, facts pertaining … to terrorism and airline flight safety. Humanitarian reasons, plus I want Russia to greatly step up their fight against ISIS & terrorism.

In a press briefing Tuesday afternoon, National Security Adviser McMaster further stated that the President “made the decision (to share the information) in the context of the conversation, which was wholly appropriate.” He also stated that “the President wasn’t even aware, you know, where this information came from. He wasn’t briefed on the source or method of the information either.”

This is not the first such instance when sensitive information may have been mishandled by senior members of the Administration. In February, during a state visit by the Prime Minister of Japan, the President reportedly discussed the response to a North Korean missile test with his advisers and the Japanese delegation in full view of diners, members, and staff at the President’s Mar-a-Lago club, in what was described as an “al fresco situation room.” Also in February, the Wall Street Journal reported that “U.S. intelligence officials have withheld sensitive intelligence from President Donald Trump because they are concerned it could be leaked or compromised.” U.S. allies have reportedly raised similar concerns.

While the President is empowered to classify and declassify information at his discretion, it is unclear whether any alleged disclosure during last week’s meeting, if it occurred, was an intentional act of “instant” declassification, an inadvertent disclosure, or done for any other reason. What is clear is that any alleged disclosure of this nature may compromise sensitive methods of intelligence collection, imperil sources who risk their lives to provide information, and result in reduced intelligence-sharing with our partners and reduced confidence in the ability of the U.S. Government to keep a secret.

Under Intelligence Community (IC) Directives issued by your office, damage assessments are used “to evaluate actual or potential damage to national security resulting from the unauthorized disclosure or compromise of classified national intelligence.” IC Directive 732 states:

In cases where the unauthorized disclosure or compromise involves classified national intelligence originating from or otherwise affecting more than one IC element or U.S. Government department or agency, there will be a Community damage assessment. Such damage assessments shall include participation and support from the affected IC elements and other representatives as directed by the DNI.

The Directive charges DNI’s National Counterintelligence Executive to “(o)versee and coordinate equity reviews and formal damage assessments within the IC” and “(l)ead, when designated by the DNI, or facilitate damage assessment teams when the unauthorized disclosure or compromise involves classified national intelligence affecting more than one IC element or U.S. Government department or agency.”

We request that you determine whether classified information was disclosed or compromised in any way during the May 10, 2017 meeting, and if so, to designate the National Counterintelligence Executive, in consultation with the Inspector General of the Intelligence Community, as the lead agency for conducting a damage assessment. Additionally, please provide unclassified written responses to the following as soon as possible, but no later than June 1, 2017:

1. Was any classified information disclosed or compromised during the meeting between President Trump and representatives of the Russian government on May 10, 2017?

2. If classified information was disclosed or compromised, please provide:

a. A description of the circumstances under which the disclosure or compromise occurred;

b. An itemized list of the classification level of any such information disclosed or compromised as well as whether such information has been declassified or downgraded as a result of the disclosure or compromise;

c. Whether any steps taken to alter or destroy notes or transcripts related to the May 10 meeting or limit their distribution complied with applicable security protocols regarding security violations;

d. A list of all individuals who attended the meeting, including the names of Russian officials;

e. A description of steps taken by President Trump or other U.S. officials to ensure that the information disclosed would not be shared with any other foreign government, including whether the President or his advisers requested any assurance not to share this information; and

f. A description of steps the Intelligence Community has taken or will take to minimize the potential loss of intelligence in future meetings with foreign leaders.

Thank you very much for your prompt attention to this matter.

Sincerely yours,

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Four Corners resident on May 10, 2017 vote preserving BLM gas reclamation rule

May 19, 2017

KGLP Station Manager Rachel Kaub speaks with Gloria Lehmer, of Farmington, NM, about the May 10, 2017 vote by the U.S. congress preserving the BLM rule requiring fossil fuel developers to reclaim waster gas products from their mining operations.

The Congressional Review Act (CRA) allows Congress to undo federal rules finalized in the last few months of a President’s term with little to no debate and simple majority votes. Unfortunately, most of the rules being targeted provide environmental, public health, and related financial protections.  The rule applies to drilling for oil and gas on federal and tribal lands. There are leaks along the entire production process, an estimated 40 billion cubic feet escaping each year from the roughly 100,000 wells on federal lands.

Gloria lives in the middle of New Mexico’s San Juan Basin, an old and large drilling field with approximately 30,000 wells. Scientists recently discovered that a cloud of methane, sometimes referred to as the methane hot spot, is sitting over the Four Corners region, and over Gloria’s home. The hot spot is linked to oil and gas development and researchers recently found that just 10 percent of oil and gas sites they examined in the area are contributing half of the hot spot’s emissions. Gloria is very involved in the local community, and spent 25 years as a speech pathologist in the local hospital and schools.

--- May 10, 2017 press release by U.S. Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico ---

Udall: Senate Rejects Repeal of Commonsense Natural Gas Waste Prevention Rule
Vote is victory for taxpayers, school children and the environment
 
WASHINGTON — May 10, 2017 - U.S. Senator Tom Udall issued the following statement after the Senate voted 49-51, defeating a measure to repeal the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) natural gas waste prevention rule through the Congressional Review Act (CRA). Udall helped lead the fight against the repeal.
 
"This is a victory for taxpayers and school children in New Mexico — because we were able to fend off this dangerous repeal, New Mexico will continue to benefit from the BLM's commonsense steps to prevent the waste of taxpayer-owned natural gas, create jobs and shrink the methane hotspot hanging over the Four Corners region. This also is a victory for the fierce opponents of our out-of-control campaign finance system, which has allowed powerful industries like big oil and gas to wield enormous political power to pad its bottom line at the expense of Americans' health and our climate. I want to thank all of the advocates in New Mexico and across the country who fought this repeal for many months.

"We are definitively better off with this rule in place, which enables producers to use simple inexpensive solutions to prevent waste and save resources. Until the BLM's rule was implemented late last year, $100 million in taxpayer-owned natural gas was lost each year from oil and gas wells operating on federal public lands in New Mexico. That is money that our cash-strapped state desperately needs to help balance the budget, pay for text books and other educational materials for our students. By leaving this rule in place, we have a chance at recouping lost revenue to help balance the budget, create jobs and reduce the dangerous levels of greenhouse gases and associated pollution being released into the air from leaking equipment and through venting and flaring. 

“New Mexico is home to significant oil and gas production, which is a source of good jobs and critical revenue for our state government and school system. But the industry arguments against this rule did not hold water -- since the rule came into effect in November 2016, the industry has added approximately 2,700 jobs nationwide and the number of drilling rigs in operation has increased over 50 percent. The economic health of this highly profitable industry is driven primarily by the price of oil and gas -- we certainly can afford reasonable, commonsense regulations to prevent waste and pollution.
 
"Make no mistake, the Trump administration will keep trying through other means to reverse these protections. But I will keep up the fight for New Mexico taxpayers, jobs and clean air and water." 
 
 

 

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Sax man Artie Black performs in Gallup with On Call Jazz & Red Rock Strings 5/12-5/14/17

May 12, 2017

KGLP Station Manager Rachel Kaub speaks with Bill Krzymowski of Gallup's Red Rock String Ensemble, and Artie Black, a Chicago-based saxophonist who is performing in Gallup with On Call Jazz Friday, May 12, 2017 @ 7pm in Angela's Cafe, at the Gallup Amtrak station, and then on Sunday, Mother's Day, May 14, 2017, with the Red Rock String Ensemble at First United Methodist Church.

http://artieblack.com/home

 

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Gallup resident recounts the April 29, 2017 Climate March

May 11, 2017

KGLP Station Manager Rachel Kaub speaks with Rick Kruis about his participation in the Climate March on April 29th, and about efforts to interest Congress in an alternative to the Carbon Tax that both conservatives and progressives might back.

https://peoplesclimate.org/

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El Morro Theatre stages Reduced Shakepeare Company satires 5/5 thru 5/14/17

May 4, 2017

KGLP Station Manager Rachel Kaub visits the cast and crew from the productions of two Reduced Shakespeare Company-originated to be staged May 5 through May 14, 2017:

The Complete History of America (Abridged) at El Morro Theatre:
7pm May 5th and May 6th
2pm & 6:30pm May 7th
7pm Encore May 13th during Arts Crawl

The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged) at El Morro Theatre:
7pm May 12th
5pm May 13th
2pm & 6:30pm May 14th

All tickets $5 (Kids 12 & under free)

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Gallup Habitat for Humanity seeks expert volunteers and board

May 4, 2017

KGLP Station Manager speaks with Bill Bright, of Habitat for Humanity, discussing ongoing needs for volunteers with various expertise and those willing to attend training in order to help with the paperwork, technical aspects, and other tasks involved with building new homes for low-income families in the Gallup, New Mexico area.

More details on Habitat Gallup may be found at:

http://www.habitatgallup.org/

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Herbert Joe discusses Seniors Art Exhibition at Gallup Library 5/5/17

May 4, 2017

Artists Herbert Joe speaks with KGLP Station Manager Rachel Kaub about how his art reflects his upbringing.  Mr. Joe's work is included in a Coyote Canyon Rehabilitation Center – Art Exhibition at Gallup's Octavia Fellin Public Library during the month of May, 2017, with a reception taking place on Friday, May 5th, from 4 until 6pm.

Coyote Canyon Rehabilitation Center – Art Exhibition

Throughout May residents of the Coyote Canyon Rehabilitation Center will display their works of art in the library. On Friday May 5th from 4pm to 6pm, there will be an opening reception to welcome the artists and their art.

CCRC was established in 1972 for individuals on the Navajo Nation with disabilities. The Arts Program was created in September 2001, and provides training in several art mediums such as silversmithing, photography, bead making, painting, and weaving. This art program is designed to be a long term opportunity to provide art training to Native American adults with developmental disabilities and give them opportunities to display their artwork. One student has his artwork displayed for sale in the Southwest Indian Foundation catalog. The art department also travels to various shows and events throughout the year with the students promoting their creations.

 

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